No One Solution Will Dominate the Cambrian Explosion of Digital Identifiers

Over the past year, many solutions have emerged as a means to fill the niche left behind by the third-party cookie – and while not all solutions in this space take the form of newly minted digital identifiers, the population of upstart cookieless IDs continues to grow in size, features, and wide-ranging industry support. This raises the question of just how we’ll identify the ultimate cookieless ID.

Google Postpones Cookie Day of Reckoning

Google announced it will not phase out cookies, which allow advertisers to track users across the Web, until mid- to late 2023. It had previously said it would do so by 2022.

What Brands Can Do When the Cookie Crumbles

As third-party cookies are phased out, brands will have to stay nimble to weather the transition successfully. It’s a good idea to shift focus to contextual marketing and build up first-party data now. Keep an eye on better alternatives like Unified ID 2.0, and watch how agencies are adapting. That way, you’ll be ready when the cookie crumbles.

No Cookies, No Problem: Harnessing the Power of Multi-Dimensional First-Party Data

While many have said that the deprecation of third-party cookies and tracking mechanisms will have a negative impact on personalized marketing, the fact is that this has finally opened the door to a much more effective approach: making full use of the richness of available first-party data.

Private Ad Marketplaces Pave the Way for Post-Cookie Advertising

Private marketplace ad programs (PMPs) are becoming more and more popular with advertisers. In 2020, eMarketer announced that programmatic ad spending on private marketplaces will exceed open exchanges for the foreseeable future. Let that sink in for a minute — the exchanges that have long underpinned the way we way buy digital media are no longer the most popular tactic for media buyers.

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Retail Performance Platforms Can Boost Brands in a Cookieless Future

Brands searching for ways to connect, understand, and engage with consumers throughout the omnichannel journey can find an abundance of data through retailer performance platforms that can be impactful, actionable, and measurable in future campaign planning. These platforms can offer onsite (such as sponsored search and display) and offsite (such as digital out-of-home and social media) opportunities for brands to attract shoppers, and these advertisement opportunities can then be measured and analyzed, leading to more valuable interactions.

4 Things to Consider When Choosing a Universal ID

Preparing for a cookieless future means getting on board with Universal IDs — there are many in the space and in the spirit of the open web, you’ll likely be working with a number of them by the end of the year. The choices that you make at this point are important, as these are long-term relationships with meaningful impact on the bottom line. So, be thorough — while there are many Universal IDs to choose from, they’re far from the same. The countdown to the demise of third-party cookies is minutes away from midnight, so start your evaluation now to ensure you don’t rush into a poor decision.

Tapad’s Switchboard Aims to Unify Fragmented Identity Solutions

In lieu of the cookie, ad tech firms are proposing a slew of disparate solutions. To solve the fragmentation issue, Tapid launched Switchboard this morning.

DISQO’s Case for Panel Data as the Post-Cookie Solution

Audience insights firm DISQO thinks it has the solution that will fill the data holes the deprecation of third-party cookies will cause: panel data.

How Privacy Will Change Digital Marketing This Year

The marketing industry finds itself facing the most significant disruption since the inception of digital: privacy changes, especially the end of third-party cookies. Google Chrome is inching closer to Deprecation Day for the third-party cookie, and though we still don’t know exactly when that is, the digital marketing industry is preparing to pivot in fundamental […]

What is Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoCs)?

Federated Learning of Cohorts is a method Google has devised to track Internet users’ interests and serve them ads relevant to those interests. The method aims to be attentive to privacy by grouping thousands of users into these interest-based cohorts. Therefore, the thinking goes, users still see ads relevant to them, but ads less finely […]

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Third-Party Data Remains Even as Cookies Deprecate

Third-party cookies are crumbling, but third-party data may be on the rise. Lotame, a data enrichment platform, manages what it calls the “world’s largest second- and third-party data marketplace.” This gives the company among ad tech’s best views into how companies are deploying data and what they’re buying. Lotame found that third-party data sales skyrocketed […]

Predictions Roundup: Organic Search and Cookie Deprecation

Experts assess changes to local search and location marketing in the wake of Google search updates, privacy changes, and cookie depreciation.

Digital Advertising’s Big Moves in 2021

2020 was a challenging year for digital advertising, and there’s no reason to think 2021 won’t be as well. The industry is facing several issues, including privacy and cookies, ad tech dominance and ad fraud. And they’re all coming to a head now. With that in mind, here are five big moves I anticipate this […]

Marketing in 2021: Universal ID Race and Creative Efficiency

Marketing in 2021 will bring a universal ID race that The Trade Desk is leading, though Amazon DSP is a dark horse. It will also spur greater creative efficiency.

2021 Holds a Bright Future for Advertising. Yes, Really

While 2021 holds a lot of uncertainty when it comes to the pandemic, there are absolutely things that marketers and publishers can and should plan for. That entails making identity, data quality, and privacy a key part of their strategy for the year. 

As Cookies Crumble, Can Location Data Pick Up the Pieces?

One potential and promising alternative to third-party cookies is location data. Captured from mobile users as they move through the physical world, location data can be used for a range of purposes and personalization.

Real-world visitation patterns offer clues to user identity, brand affinities, and purchase intent. Putting aside that Covid-19 has radically upended movement patterns for the time being, regular airport or hotel visitation can identify business travelers, routine presence in a gym suggests health-consciousness, and weekly fast-food visits implies the opposite. Someone visiting car dealerships is probably an “auto-intender,” and so on.

The One Where Adtech and Martech Get Married

It’s impossible to have any certainty about the de facto cookieless targeting solution of the future or what solutions will emerge from Google’s privacy sandbox. But what is clear is that the ability to precisely target audiences in adtech without cookies will likely have very similar applications for personalization use cases in martech.

In order words, the data used to show a targeted ad to a person without cookies could simultaneously power the way a digital experience is personalized for that same person.

Blocking Third-Party Cookies Will Not Mean the End of Marketing Attribution

The demise of third-party cookies will not mean the end of digital advertising and the ability to assign proper attribution to individuals engaging in various touchpoints along the buyer journey. Several entities are currently hashing out other methodologies brands can leverage to retrieve audience analytics.

Marketing attribution providers will continue to provide reliable data to enterprise marketers on consumers and their customer journeys through the sales funnel. Attribution providers worth their salt will not only make sure they are compliant with the tightened rules around cookies but also ensure their clients are following the letter of the law.

The Cookie’s Collapse is No More Consequential than the Shift to Mobile

The cookie is on its last days, enjoying an extended farewell tour, thanks to Google’s decision to view third-party cookies as obsolete within Chrome by 2022. While many have painted the cookie’s waning days as the potential end of digital advertising, the truth is that this move is really no more consequential than the gradual shift from the desktop web to the mobile device.

Similar to the shift to mobile, the loss of the cookie will change the way that digital media is bought and sold and the way that many companies approach third-party data. It will likely put several companies out of business if they fail to adapt. But this change will merely be a paradigm shift — one that is long overdue — and not the nuclear fallout that many are expecting.