LBMA: Google Maps Goes Head to Head with Instacart

In this episode of Location Weekly, the Location-Based Marketing Association covers SPREE Interactive taking its VR platform global, a Robot mixologist serving drinks and collecting data, Google Maps going head to head with Instacart, and Square launching a Photo Studio app.

LBMA: Google Enters OEM Vehicle Navigation Space

In this episode of Location Weekly, the Location-Based Marketing Association covers Google getting into the OEM vehicle navigation space, Giant Food piloting mobile deals on perishable foods, Lowe’s launching a “room scanning tool” using LIDAR in their app, and Amazon’s Alexa coming to hospitals and assisted living homes.

What’s Behind Google’s Fake Review Problem?

In an analysis of more than 4 million store reviews on Google, Facebook, Yelp, and TripAdvisor, Uberall and The Transparency Company found that Google has the highest average percentage of inauthentic reviews across business categories. More than one in 10 reviews on Google’s platform was identified as fraudulent or fake in Uberall’s analysis. The category with the highest percentage of fake reviews was locksmiths, while pharmacies came in as the category with the lowest percentage of fake reviews.

Google Local Search Trends IV: Federation

The initial launch of the GMB API in late 2015 allowed partners to maintain listings in near-real-time and at a much greater scale than was possible before. Now we’re in the midst of another sea change. Since the beginning of 2021, the API has been undergoing a complete overhaul from the ground up, a change that, once completed, will leave us with a totally different architecture that is more flexible and capable of much quicker iteration. This means, in all likelihood, that Google My Business as it is used by partners and the businesses who work with them will be able to move faster to fix issues and release new features.

Google Local Search Trends III: Socialization

In this third of four installments in my series on recent and ongoing trends in local search, I want to focus on signs that Google’s local platform — comprising Google My Business, Google Maps, and the local component of Google Search — has become, under our noses, a massive social network. Google has achieved this status not through traditional methods of connecting users to each other, but by allowing and encouraging users to share their experiences, questions, and opinions about local businesses in a variety of forms and at a massive scale.

Broadening Local: Expert Roundup

A trio of local search experts expound on the latest in the industry. Claire Carlile proposes Google My Business as a CMS and covers how businesses should approach the channel; Miriam Ellis explores the increasingly blurred lines between different categories of sites and businesses; and Damian Rollison delineates the major trends shaping the trajectory of local search, especially on Google.

Google Local Search Trends II: Verticalization

This is the second in a series of four articles covering the themes behind many of Google’s recent local search feature releases and interface updates. In the first installment, I discussed Google’s increasingly personalized or customized search results, marked by content pulled from GMB profiles, the business website, and Google users, and matched to specific queries so that each SERP is unique. In this second installment, I’ll be talking too about interfaces that differ according to what you’re searching for, but in this case the differences are verticalized.

Google Local Search Trends I: Personalization

Though it’s not always easy to find the common threads in Google’s complex evolution of the local search consumer experience, some themes do stand out, such as the drive toward increasingly personalized search results, which I’ll be covering in this initial entry in the series. Fortunately for marketers, personalization, along with the other themes I’ll cover, offers numerous opportunities to outpace the competition and convert more searchers into buyers. A better understanding of these emerging trends will help marketers prioritize their efforts.

Google Postpones Cookie Day of Reckoning

Google announced it will not phase out cookies, which allow advertisers to track users across the Web, until mid- to late 2023. It had previously said it would do so by 2022.

Verizon Provides FLoC Alternative. Will It Work?

Verizon became the latest player to compete against Google’s FloCs this month with the launch of its new Next-Gen Solutions tool. The move marks a broader shift in ad tech toward contextual ads.

LBMA: Can FLoCs Replace the Third-Party Cookie?

In this episode of Location Weekly, the Location-Based Marketing Association covers Google’s FLoCs as an alternative to the disappearing third-party cookie, the AR platform Beerscans turning beer labels into augmented reality experiences, Krispy Kreme offering free donuts to encourage vaccination, and GroundTruth acquiring Addy.

Privacy-forward Digital Marketing Can Outperform Traditional Models

The results of a new campaign by Brave Software and Dentsu International show that digital privacy might not be the monolith that it’s thought to be, and that advertisers can still generate a positive ROI on their campaigns without sacrificing consumers’ online privacy.

Google’s Ad Changes: The King Just Built a Moat Around His Castle

The initial frenzy over Google’s news regarding its latest privacy updates has abated, and now it’s time to really think about what it means – for Google, for brands, and for the industry as a whole.

As governments have lit a fire under brands and consumers have become more data-conscious, the future of marketing and advertising is unfolding before us. Let’s take a dive into what it all really signifies.

Google’s Latest Privacy Play Has Big Implications for the Open Web

Google’s recent announcement that it would stop selling ads based on users’ specific web browsing histories was met with enthusiasm among consumer privacy experts. Within the local marketing and advertising community, the reaction was different.

Not Every Agency and Ad Tech Firm is Decrying Google’s Privacy Moves

The big question is what Google’s shift portends for users and advertisers. Is it actually a boon to user privacy? Will it undermine digital advertising? Or will models like Google’s Federated Learning of Cohorts, which will allow targeting of groups of users with similar interests instead of targeting of individuals per se, fill the gaps?

Expert Roundup: How Will Retail Transform in 2021? Part II

In part II of our retail expert roundup, we cover mixed reality’s role in retail, data, and privacy compliance, and how retail can recover and rebound in 2021.

Expert Roundup: How Will Retail Transform in 2021?

Retail transformation experts expound on Google and Amazon’s approaches to e-commerce, managing customer relationships, and targeting after cookies.

DISQO’s Case for Panel Data as the Post-Cookie Solution

Audience insights firm DISQO thinks it has the solution that will fill the data holes the deprecation of third-party cookies will cause: panel data.

Google’s FLoCs: “Advertisers and Publishers Are Right to Be Wary”

Google’s FLoCs is supposed to boost privacy in ad targeting. But the actual efficacy of the program and Google’s habit of boosting itself are fueling concerns.

What is Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoCs)?

Federated Learning of Cohorts is a method Google has devised to track Internet users’ interests and serve them ads relevant to those interests. The method aims to be attentive to privacy by grouping thousands of users into these interest-based cohorts. Therefore, the thinking goes, users still see ads relevant to them, but ads less finely […]