Scoutmob Adds Etsy-like Commerce, More Content | Street Fight

News

Scoutmob Adds Etsy-like Commerce, More Content

1 Comment 13 July 2012 by

In late 2011, there was a lot of talk about the convergence of content and commerce, heralding editorial context as huge driver for local plays. Since then, things have cooled off a bit, but, fresh off a $3.4 million series A round of financing, mobile deals play Scoutmob is doubling down on content/commerce in a big way.

The Atlanta-based company has launched an independent commerce site this morning called Shoppe that blends small editorial features with an Etsy-like local marketplace. The site, which remains web-only at launch, allows a curated set of local artisans to sell products and tell their stories via the startups existing set of Local Editors.

Scoutmob initially entered the content business in February when it added a hyperlocal content layer to its existing local deals app. Founder Michael Tavani told Street Fight in an email that Shoppe is part of the same process of pressing the divisions between editorial “church and state” that he sees as antiquated today: “Traditional media would have a hard time drawing that line and we’ve been built on that premise, but it’s the way a local media property in 2012 should be built.”

Over the past six months, we’ve seen more and more discussion in the deals space around operational techniques like targeting and analytics, largely due to the commodization of the deal itself into a sort of high-tech coupon. Content adds both differentiation to the user experience and value to a company like Scoutmob as a commerce and discovery brand.

“We don’t consider ourselves a traditional ecommerce player,” Tavani elaborated. “We’re a local brand that engages users by surfacing the best things going on locally and physical products are an extension of that.”

I’ve said this repeatedly: local is not a layer; it’s the stack. The recent suggestion that some daily deal companies should enter the wider e-commerce market overlooks largely untapped markets like local artisans and events, which LivingSocial has jumped into with a big announcement this morning.

As Tavani told me:  “Local is more than the neighborhood coffee shop.”

(Screenshot Below)

  • Cliff

    “Etsy-like commerce” is a pretty accurate description, as they appear to actually use Etsy as their main source of finding “local artisans”. The only difference is Scoutmob asks you to do more work than selling through Etsy (shipping+handeling, submitting shipping figues, waiting for payment…) at a wholesale price minus the Scoutmob cut. Oh, and you pay the shipping costs upfront, and wait a week for reimbursement, and two weeks for payment on any actual product sold.

    So maybe Etsy-like isn’t a great comparison after all. Best of luck to all Etsy sellers who are contacted (ironically, through Etsy) and offered to sell on Scoutmob, sounds like you’ll need it. Beware of the differences, e.g. doing more work for less money.




Newsletter

Get hyperlocal industry headlines in your inbox every morning. Subscribe to the Street Fight Daily newsletter.

Follow Us

Get the latest Street Fight news, information and analysis via Twitter and Facebook.

The Local Merchant Report

Learn how to better target this important-yet-elusive market. Key insights, case studies, and strategies make this a report you can't afford to miss.
Get your copy today!

Free eBook

How Mobile Location and Behavioral Context Skyrocket Conversion Rates: Location personas increase the value of ad inventories and give publishers a way to better target content. Learn how it works and improve your ROI now. Get the ebook produced by:
Download here

The $20 Billion Mobile Marketing Opportunity

Strategies and insights into the landscape of targeting options and how they deliver foot traffic and sales for SMBs.
Get your copy today!

Why Local is the Future of Commerce

The local marketplace is under renovation and four layers of disruptive technologies have emerged. Siloed early on, these industries are starting to coalesce, working together to form layers in a coordinated stack. Read the introduction to "The Local Stack" special report, underwritten by Yext.

How Back-Office Innovation Is Transforming Local

In this new report, Street Fight takes a look at the impact of supply-side technologies on the local marketing industry, detailing the opportunities and risks that these emergent services present to existing solutions providers.

Twitter

© 2014 Street Fight.

Powered by WordPress. Hosting by Page.ly