The New News | Street Fight - Part 18

After Shuttering, Village Soup Serves Up a Living Digital Legacy

Tom Grubisich

After Shuttering, Village Soup Serves Up a Living Digital Legacy

Less than two weeks after Village Soup was abruptly shuttered, the print and digital mini-conglomerate of Midcoast Maine is being resurrected. The company’s new owner, Reade Brower, who publishes Midcoast’s Free Press, praised the Village Soup publications, and said he wanted to return them to the public as intact as possible.

Media Surveys Give Hyperlocals Short Shrift

Tom Grubisich

Media Surveys Give Hyperlocals Short Shrift

What’s needed is a survey that’s as thorough as Pew’s but which is confined to those communities with at least one credible independent site as well as a network site — like a Patch or Main Street Connect outlet — and at least one “legacy” (newspaper or local TV) site…

Hyperlocals Diverge on How to Mine Rich Lode of Digital Ads

Tom Grubisich

Hyperlocals Diverge on How to Mine Rich Lode of Digital Ads

Even though digital advertising is estimated to grow 40% by 2015, according to Pew, the research center said few major sites were capturing any share of this new cornucopia. If that’s the story with bigger sites, what, I wondered, was happening among the more than 3,000 hyperlocal news sites, which, by my estimate, reach 25 million people — a big chunk of the consumer market that advertisers covet…

Jane Stevens: The ‘Revolution’ of Social Media and Local News

Tom Grubisich

Jane Stevens: The ‘Revolution’ of Social Media and Local News

We know that news is being transformed by social media — the Facebook or Twitter effect, for short — but do we really understand that what’s happening, especially at the local level, can be, and maybe should be, a revolution? I borrow that potent description from journalist Jane Stevens, whom I recently caught up with to talk about how social media is transforming local…

How Is Citizen Journalism Playing Out Today?

Tom Grubisich

How Is Citizen Journalism Playing Out Today?

Citizen journalism has propelled hundreds of hyperlocal news sites into existence. In the middle of the last decade, CitJ, particularly at the community level, was the hot topic in new media. Journalism’s thinkers saw it as a necessary and overdue reinvention of news (see Dan Gillmor, Jay Rosen, Jeff Jarvis, among others). So how is it actually playing out today — on the ground? To find out, I asked publishers and editors who have been part of the hyperlocal phenomenon.

What Independent Hyperlocals Need for the Long Haul

Tom Grubisich

What Independent Hyperlocals Need for the Long Haul

The surging growth of hyperlocal news—today there are more than 3,000 sites in operation and hundreds more in various stages of formation—is being driven by independents. The media disrupters are the people who have the passion and gumption to develop and run their sites with financing from their own personal credit cards.

I’m thinking of entrepreneurs like Debbie Galant, who with $3,000 co-founded  Baristanet in the crowded media market of northern New Jersey in 2004,  expanding it to seven communities. And Scott Brodbeck who, while he was completing a master’s program, started ARLNow in  Arlington, Va., in suburban Washington D.C.

In Jefferson’s Hometown, a Hyperlocal Focuses on Digital Democracy

Tom Grubisich

In Jefferson’s Hometown, a Hyperlocal Focuses on Digital Democracy

Brian Wheeler is executive director of Charlottesville Tomorrow, a thriving nonprofit hyperlocal in Virginia that focuses on land use and other civic issues that are key to protecting the character of the community that was the home of Thomas Jefferson. We talked to Wheeler about his unusual definition of user engagement, and how he’s working to take it to a new level…

Nielsen’s Undercount of News: Why the Numbers Don’t Add Up

Tom Grubisich

Nielsen’s Undercount of News: Why the Numbers Don’t Add Up

Social networking has become the 800-pound gorilla of the Internet. That’s what Nielsen is trumpeting in a new report. And news, it says, is a tiny mouse.

Or is it?

Nielsen’s Social Media Report says news accounts for just 2.6% of Internet use compared to 22.5% for social networking and blogs.  But that news number doesn’t hold up under examination…