Michael Boland | Street Fight

Street Fight Daily: Retailers Disable Apple Pay, Yelp Buys German Competitor

The Editors

Street Fight Daily: Retailers Disable Apple Pay, Yelp Buys German Competitor

A roundup of today’s big stories in hyperlocal publishing, marketing, commerce, and technologyApple Pay Is Disabled by Rite Aid and CVS as a Rival Makes Plans (New York Times)… Yelp Buys Restaurant-Kritik To Expand Its Presence In Germany (TechCrunch)… Why NFC In The iPad Air 2 Is A Big Deal For Small Businesses (GigaOm)…

Street Fight at Two: Looking Back, Looking Forward

The Editors

Street Fight at Two: Looking Back, Looking Forward

When we first launched Street Fight in April of 2011, we saw a lot of energy coming together around consumer targeting by location, and over he past two years we’ve seen many companies in the hyperlocal space really starting to gain traction. We’ve really enjoyed the ride so far and we look forward to bringing you even more of the latest news, research and community around hyperlocal business in the coming years…

2011: The Year the Check-in Reached Puberty

Mike Boland

2011: The Year the Check-in Reached Puberty

Michael Boland is a guest author. To submit a guest post, go here.

In the location wars of the past two years, one of the battle cries has been the need to continually innovate “beyond the check-in” — building things on top of the core check-in function, driven by evolving device capability and user demand (or boredom).

Companies have taken this in various directions — “checking in” to TV shows, for example. Sector leader Foursquare has dabbled in things like Superbowl check-ins.

At least week’s Where 2.0 conference in Santa Clara, California, Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley talked about how the check-in grows up even as it stays focused on “the relationship between people and places.”..