company culture | Street Fight - Part 3

Company Culture Priorities for 2016

April Nowicki

Company Culture Priorities for 2016

In the Street Culture column we launched in 2015, Street Fight began looking more closely at the clever, fun, and smart ways startups in the hyperlocal industry are building culture into their organizations as they scale. No two companies we spoke with were the same, but many are driving their cultures along the same tracks. Based on our interviews, here are the top four culture-focused priorities for startups to address in 2016.

Why a Remote Work Policy Is Worth Considering

April Nowicki

Why a Remote Work Policy Is Worth Considering

More than 3.5 million employees work remotely at least half the time, a technology-enabled trend that’s on the rise. Many employers claim that workers are more productive when they work remotely, but some technology companies are not considering remote workers or don’t allow telecommuting at all.

Connectivity Culture Growing Beyond ‘Work Hard, Play Hard’

April Nowicki

Connectivity Culture Growing Beyond ‘Work Hard, Play Hard’

Marketing technology company Connectivity went from a 20-person company to an 80-person company in a year and a half, and it’s poised to continue accelerating. Part of Connectivity’s success stems from fostering experimentation. “We always want to hire people who are entrepreneurs themselves, and let them know that they’re not going to get in trouble for failing,” said CEO Matt Booth.

Fundrise

DC Startup Fundrise Is Redefining How We Invest in Real Estate

April Nowicki

DC Startup Fundrise Is Redefining How We Invest in Real Estate

Major real estate development projects like Manhattan’s 3 World Trade Center cost billions, and budget overruns often delay construction. Enter Fundrise: The company’s technology opens doors for individuals who want to invest in local real estate developments, but maybe don’t have millions of dollars lying around. Fundrise has seen 1,500 percent growth in deal volume since May 2014.

Street Culture: Humility and Good Conversations at Instacart

April Nowicki

Street Culture: Humility and Good Conversations at Instacart

On-demand grocery shopping and delivery service Instacart is make headway at disrupting a multi-billion-dollar industry. Driving that effort is a relentless focus on satisfying customers. “One policy we’ve implemented at Instacart is that every employee, from the engineers up to our CEO, goes out shopping once a quarter to get an understanding of being a shopper and how our service affects the customer. Everybody here does it,” says vice president of people Mathew Caldwell.

Street Culture: Signpost on Being a Scrappy Startup

April Nowicki

Street Culture: Signpost on Being a Scrappy Startup

When you’re fast-growing startup company, the most important thing is hiring the right people. That means people who can do the job, and also, in some cases, people who are willing to build desks, said Justin Donnarumma, director of sales at Signpost, a marketing automation technology company that launched in 2010. “That’s the kind of scrappiness we look for in new hires.”